Category: news

Refuge responds to announcement that the Domestic Abuse Bill will be carried over into the next parliament.

In response to the announcement today that the Prime Minister intends to ensure that the Domestic Abuse Bill is carried over into the next parliamentary session, Sandra Horley CBE, Chief Executive of national domestic abuse charity Refuge said:

‘We are delighted that the Government has today made a clear statement confirming that the Domestic Abuse Bill will be carried over into the next parliamentary session. This Bill represents many years of work for Refuge and our colleagues across the Violence against Women and Girls sector. In England and Wales, two women every week are killed by their current or former partner and this Bill has the potential to transform the response to violence against women and girls. We look forward to working with the Government to ensure the Bill is as strong as possible and transforms the lives of women and girls across the country.’

For more information, please email press@refuge.org.uk or call 0207 395 7731. Outside of working hours, please call 07970 894240.

The post Refuge responds to announcement that the Domestic Abuse Bill will be carried over into the next parliament. appeared first on Refuge Charity – Domestic Violence Help.

Applying for the WFTV Pat Llewellyn Bursary Fund

The WFTV Pat Llewellyn Bursary offers development funding for a factual or factual entertainment TV project, which can be either a one-off or a series and is open to all women regardless of their experience.

We want to make this award as diverse and inclusive as possible, so it is open to all women – even those who have never made a TV programme before.

There are four bursaries available – two for Welsh candidates, that covers either women working in Wales or those of Welsh origin, and two for women anywhere else in the UK. Each winner will be awarded £10,000 and to apply could not be simpler.

Applicants just need to supply 250 words about their project and then a further 250 words about themselves. Applications close on Monday 30 September.

Apply here.

 

More information about applying

It is free to apply, but you may only submit ONE application with ONE idea. If you submit more than one application, or more than one idea in a single application, ONLY your first submission/idea will be considered.

For more information about submitting an application to the Fund, please read our FAQs-document, which includes information about what is classified as a factual entertainment or factual TV project, as well as tips for completing the application.

 

Key Dates

Applications open: Tuesday 11 June 2019

Applications close: Monday 30 September.

Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed by members of the awarding committee in November, and the Bursary winners will be announced in November 2019.

Key Terms

  1. To apply, you must be resident in the UK.
  2. All women or those who self-identify as women can apply.
  3. You do not need to be a member of WFTV to apply.
  4. If you are the owner of a production company, your annual turnover must be below £1m. In certain cases, verification of turnover may be required.

To find out more about how the Bursary Fund is run, click here.

If you have any queries, please e-mail: bursary@wftv.org.uk.

The post Applying for the WFTV Pat Llewellyn Bursary Fund appeared first on Women in Film & TV.

Between the Waves – Feminist Library at Tate Exchange

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The Feminist Library was again at Tate Exchange at the end of June. Our curatorial group created a two-day exhibition and event programme, Between the Waves, paying homage to Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp. This creatively explored ideas of home, migration and the connections between movements, past and present.

 

In the makeshift ‘campsite’ space a variety of activities took place. These included reading groups in English and Spanish, a creative writing workshop, drumming, weaving, reading space and drop-in making activities for all ages run by SHELF Collective. We also screened the 1983 documentary ‘Carry Greenham Home’ on loop throughout the weekend, plus films about the Feminist Library past and present and memories of Greenham. Thanks to all who contributed to make this such a special and magical space. Here are some photos of the weekend.

Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange
Feminist Library at Tate Exchange

Photos by Alex Wojcik

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Photos by Nic Wassell

Launch of our new Sexual Harassment at Work legal advice line for women

Rights of Women will today launch the only specialist free legal advice line for women in England and Wales experiencing sexual harassment at work. According to the TUC, as many as 1 in 2 of women have experienced sexual harassment at work. The legal advice will be provided by Rights of Women legal staff and […]

The post Launch of our new Sexual Harassment at Work legal advice line for women appeared first on Rights of Women.

Meet our Voices from the Frontline Grantees

This year, 26 groups and organisations fighting for gender equality in the UK will receive grants of £500 to £5,000 from the fourth round of Rosa’s Voices from the Frontline grants programme. Each organisation works in one of Rosa’s four pillars  leadership and representation, safety, health and wellbeing, and economic justice – and the grant will support their work in everything from campaigning for abortion rights to supporting BME victims of domestic violence.

Women's charity and non-profit fund

These are the bold, brilliant women advocating for those who face intersecting disadvantages including race, class, sexuality, disability, poverty and migration status. Read on to find out what they’re all about, and why their work is so vitally important.

 

Economic Justice

  

Deaf Ethnic Women’s Association
Encouraging deaf ethnic women to take part in society and address economic injustice is central to DEWA, a national organisation run by deaf women from ethnic minority groups. The £5,000 grant will fund accessible, shareable videos with BSL and subtitled, designed to empower deaf women to make positive changes in their lives and speak out for fair pay.

Women’s Budget Group
The Women’s Budget Group monitors the impact of government policies on men and women, puts forward policies for a gender equal future and encourages women’s groups to participate in economic debates. The £5,000 grant will help to transform its research and analysis into digestible tools, paying for content creation that blends statistics with real women’s stories.

Women’s Resource Centre
As the leading national support organisation for the women’s sector in the UK, the Women’s Resource Centre strives to link up all aspects of inequality faced by women and girls. The £5,000 grant will support 600 members to launch the second phase of its tampon tax campaign, with a pack that will enable members to engage with local decision makers, MPs and the media.

The Growing Club CIC
The Growing Club CIC helps women to become more economically active and build sustainable businesses through training and workshops. With the £4,500 grant, the organisation will promote self-belief among older women and change societal perceptions through two days of multimedia workshops for women aged over 50.

The Motherhood Plan Community Interest Company
Motherhood creates myriad challenges for women in their careers — and the Motherhood Plan Community Interest Company plans to launch a campaign to create a culture shift in the way flexible working is viewed and implemented. The £4,000 will fund a petition, a video aimed at businesses, and a FlexAppeal flash mob with influencer Anna Whitehouse of Mother Pukka.

 

Health and Wellbeing 

Girls Friendly Society

Since 1875, Girls Friendly Society has boosted girls’ self-esteem, confidence and emotional wellbeing through weekly group sessions. With its £5,000, the society will launch a campaign and training project in the North East to fight gender equality and increase girls’ aspirations. The grant will also fund a new Campaign Coordinator to help girls to amplify their voices. 

Chester Sexual Abuse Support Service

Chester Sexual Abuse Support Service is a friendly team of women that helps survivors of sexual abuse feel safe and supported. The £5,000 will fund a campaign to raise awareness of sexual violence and the rights of survivors in the deaf community, through sexual violence awareness workshops and the creation of three short videos. 

Alliance for Choice Belfast

Pro-woman and pro-choice, Alliance for Choice Belfast campaigns tirelessly for abortion rights in Northern Ireland. The group will use £4,750 to fund a video and workshop campaign that challenges the misinformation and stigma around abortion in Northern Ireland, with two focus groups developing key messages that will become the focal point of three short films. 

Rivers LPC

Breaking down the barriers women face when asking for support — particularly for those who are excluded for health, language, social or economic reasons — is the core focus of Rivers LPC. Its Validating Voices project, funded by the £5,000 grant, aims to identify barriers and end the social stigma connected to BME women accessing support services.

 

Leadership and Representation 

Women’s Voice 

Run by and for women in Hastings and St Leonards, Women’s Voice aims to empower local women, encourage respect across all cultures and promote gender equality. With its £5,000, the organisation will develop an initiative and evidence-based report to highlight and remove the barriers faced by migrant women trying to access the NHS in East Sussex.

FTWW (Fair Treatment for the Women of Wales)

FTWW is a patient-led organisation for women and girls living in Wales who need practical advice, help and support dealing with their local health services. The £5,000 grant will enable FTWW to continue its community groups, lobby government to ensure women’s health is a priority area, and push for the new education curriculum to include menstrual wellbeing.

Excel Women’s Association

From youth projects to vocational training, Excel Women’s Association provides advice and support in Somali and English for women living in Barking and Dagenham. The £4,800 grant will fund a project to reduce the lack of representation of BME women in the local area, through practical workshops including public speaking, letter writing and self-confidence. 

Muslim Women’s Sport Foundation

At the heart of the foundation lies the need to increase the involvement of Muslim women and girls without compromising religious or cultural values. A social media campaign funded by the £5,000 grant will launch alongside the foundation’s new all-star Muslim basketball team, helping to create strong female sports role models within the Muslim community. 

The Happy Baby Community

From antenatal care to English lessons, The Happy Baby Community supports women who have fled from violence or traffickers, and are pregnant or with young children. The £5,000 grant will help to fund a national network of support for refugee and asylum-seeking women in the UK, including training for community representatives in advocacy skills and public speaking. 

The Magpie Project 

The Magpie Project supports mothers and children under five in temporary or insecure accommodation in Newham. With its £5,000 grant, the group will launch a grassroots activism project to challenge injustice experienced by families with no recourse to public funds. It will also fund training in parliamentary processes, advocacy and public speaking. 

Rape Crisis Tyneside and Northumberland

The organisation provides confidential counselling to women and girls over the age of 13 who live, work or study in Tyneside and Northumberland. The £5,000 grant will fund a project by RCTN’s activist group to raise awareness of the policing of women’s bodies in the North East, engaging with young women to create their own campaigns to bring about change. 

The Empower Project

Supporting communities to end gender-based violence is at the core of The Empower Project, an intersectional feminist organisation with a focus on  responding to violence and abuse in the digital age. The £4,640 grant will fund a mentoring and campaigning programme enabling marginalised young feminists to take the lead in challenging tech abuse. 

 

Safety 

Phoebe

Phoebe is a BME specialist women’s charity supporting victims of domestic violence, with a particular focus on migrant women who are newly arrived in Suffolk. With £4,800, Phoebe will launch a campaign comprising of a workshop series, information books and a conference, to raise awareness of the specific challenges faced by migrant women suffering domestic abuse. 

Bright Futures

By working with young women in their communities, Bright Futures aims to build self-esteem around issues including education, sexual health, friendships and alcohol abuse. A grant of £4,800 will help to launch a ‘Future Hope’ campaign that addresses discrimination, physical and sexual abuse experienced by sex workers. 

La Dolce Vita Project

La Dolce Vita Project is a therapeutic counselling charity that supports women impacted by domestic abuse, violence and sexual violence. It will use a £4,200 grant to launch a campaign targeting policy makers in Northern Ireland to bring in a parental alienation bill, and will support and train 10-12 survivors of domestic abuse to share their stories with policy makers.

Women’s Aid South Lanarkshire and East Renfrewshire

Needs-led services including refuge accommodation, support and information are part of this group’s aim to support and empower women who are experiencing — or have experienced — domestic abuse. With £5,000 of funding, WASLER’s art group will launch a series of events to challenge harmful attitudes that devalue and endanger the lives of women and girls.

Devon Rape Crisis and Sexual Abuse Services

The belief that no-one should have to cope with rape or sexual abuse alone is at the core of Devon Rape Crisis and Sexual Abuse Services. The £3,110 will develop a project to tackle sexual harassment experienced by women in Devon, with informative and empowering workshops, a craft event and protest events. 

BAWSO (Black African Women Step Out)

Since 1995, BAWSO has provided everything from training to temporary accommodation for those affected by domestic abuse and violence including FGM, human trafficking and forced marriage. The £4,900 grant will fund a campaign to ensure women with insecure immigration status have the right to domestic abuse services.

Baobab Women’s Project C.I.C 

Baobab advises and assists women on immigration, health, financial and housing issues. Over the course of a year with its £4,920 grant, it will support a group of women to document their stories in a photo-filled book. Once published, the book will be shared with policy makers and the public to help tackle the injustices faced by undocumented women in the UK. 

Glasgow and Clyde Rape Crisis Centre

With its £4,500 grant, Glasgow and Clyde Rape Crisis Centre aims to change how the media reports gender-based violence, ultimately encouraging more survivors to report abuse. Focus groups, research surveys, campaign videos and a media checklist will culminate in a launch event to promote the campaign and its findings.

Argyl and Bute Rape Crisis Centre

Language that reinforces gender stereotypes damages women and girls, and Argyl and Bute Rape Crisis Centre’s ‘As Good As Your Word’ campaign seeks to draw attention to it. Using £5,000 of funding, the organisation will create a series of films to illustrate the negative effect of sexist language, and in turn show how positive language can foster change. 

Meet our Voices from the Frontline Grantees

This year, 26 groups and organisations fighting for gender equality in the UK will receive grants of £500 to £5,000 from the fourth round of Rosa’s Voices from the Frontline grants programme. Each organisation works in one of Rosa’s four pillars  leadership and representation, safety, health and wellbeing, and economic justice – and the grant will support their work in everything from campaigning for abortion rights to supporting BME victims of domestic violence.

Women's charity and non-profit fund

These are the bold, brilliant women advocating for those who face intersecting disadvantages including race, class, sexuality, disability, poverty and migration status. Read on to find out what they’re all about, and why their work is so vitally important.

 

Economic Justice

  

Deaf Ethnic Women’s Association
Encouraging deaf ethnic women to take part in society and address economic injustice is central to DEWA, a national organisation run by deaf women from ethnic minority groups. The £5,000 grant will fund accessible, shareable videos with BSL and subtitled, designed to empower deaf women to make positive changes in their lives and speak out for fair pay.

Women’s Budget Group
The Women’s Budget Group monitors the impact of government policies on men and women, puts forward policies for a gender equal future and encourages women’s groups to participate in economic debates. The £5,000 grant will help to transform its research and analysis into digestible tools, paying for content creation that blends statistics with real women’s stories.

Women’s Resource Centre
As the leading national support organisation for the women’s sector in the UK, the Women’s Resource Centre strives to link up all aspects of inequality faced by women and girls. The £5,000 grant will support 600 members to launch the second phase of its tampon tax campaign, with a pack that will enable members to engage with local decision makers, MPs and the media.

The Growing Club CIC
The Growing Club CIC helps women to become more economically active and build sustainable businesses through training and workshops. With the £4,500 grant, the organisation will promote self-belief among older women and change societal perceptions through two days of multimedia workshops for women aged over 50.

The Motherhood Plan Community Interest Company
Motherhood creates myriad challenges for women in their careers — and the Motherhood Plan Community Interest Company plans to launch a campaign to create a culture shift in the way flexible working is viewed and implemented. The £4,000 will fund a petition, a video aimed at businesses, and a FlexAppeal flash mob with influencer Anna Whitehouse of Mother Pukka.

 

Health and Wellbeing 

Girls Friendly Society

Since 1875, Girls Friendly Society has boosted girls’ self-esteem, confidence and emotional wellbeing through weekly group sessions. With its £5,000, the society will launch a campaign and training project in the North East to fight gender equality and increase girls’ aspirations. The grant will also fund a new Campaign Coordinator to help girls to amplify their voices. 

Chester Sexual Abuse Support Service

Chester Sexual Abuse Support Service is a friendly team of women that helps survivors of sexual abuse feel safe and supported. The £5,000 will fund a campaign to raise awareness of sexual violence and the rights of survivors in the deaf community, through sexual violence awareness workshops and the creation of three short videos. 

Alliance for Choice Belfast

Pro-woman and pro-choice, Alliance for Choice Belfast campaigns tirelessly for abortion rights in Northern Ireland. The group will use £4,750 to fund a video and workshop campaign that challenges the misinformation and stigma around abortion in Northern Ireland, with two focus groups developing key messages that will become the focal point of three short films. 

Rivers LPC

Breaking down the barriers women face when asking for support — particularly for those who are excluded for health, language, social or economic reasons — is the core focus of Rivers LPC. Its Validating Voices project, funded by the £5,000 grant, aims to identify barriers and end the social stigma connected to BME women accessing support services.

 

Leadership and Representation 

Women’s Voice 

Run by and for women in Hastings and St Leonards, Women’s Voice aims to empower local women, encourage respect across all cultures and promote gender equality. With its £5,000, the organisation will develop an initiative and evidence-based report to highlight and remove the barriers faced by migrant women trying to access the NHS in East Sussex.

FTWW (Fair Treatment for the Women of Wales)

FTWW is a patient-led organisation for women and girls living in Wales who need practical advice, help and support dealing with their local health services. The £5,000 grant will enable FTWW to continue its community groups, lobby government to ensure women’s health is a priority area, and push for the new education curriculum to include menstrual wellbeing.

Excel Women’s Association

From youth projects to vocational training, Excel Women’s Association provides advice and support in Somali and English for women living in Barking and Dagenham. The £4,800 grant will fund a project to reduce the lack of representation of BME women in the local area, through practical workshops including public speaking, letter writing and self-confidence. 

Muslim Women’s Sport Foundation

At the heart of the foundation lies the need to increase the involvement of Muslim women and girls without compromising religious or cultural values. A social media campaign funded by the £5,000 grant will launch alongside the foundation’s new all-star Muslim basketball team, helping to create strong female sports role models within the Muslim community. 

The Happy Baby Community

From antenatal care to English lessons, The Happy Baby Community supports women who have fled from violence or traffickers, and are pregnant or with young children. The £5,000 grant will help to fund a national network of support for refugee and asylum-seeking women in the UK, including training for community representatives in advocacy skills and public speaking. 

The Magpie Project 

The Magpie Project supports mothers and children under five in temporary or insecure accommodation in Newham. With its £5,000 grant, the group will launch a grassroots activism project to challenge injustice experienced by families with no recourse to public funds. It will also fund training in parliamentary processes, advocacy and public speaking. 

Rape Crisis Tyneside and Northumberland

The organisation provides confidential counselling to women and girls over the age of 13 who live, work or study in Tyneside and Northumberland. The £5,000 grant will fund a project by RCTN’s activist group to raise awareness of the policing of women’s bodies in the North East, engaging with young women to create their own campaigns to bring about change. 

The Empower Project

Supporting communities to end gender-based violence is at the core of The Empower Project, an intersectional feminist organisation with a focus on  responding to violence and abuse in the digital age. The £4,640 grant will fund a mentoring and campaigning programme enabling marginalised young feminists to take the lead in challenging tech abuse. 

 

Safety 

Phoebe

Phoebe is a BME specialist women’s charity supporting victims of domestic violence, with a particular focus on migrant women who are newly arrived in Suffolk. With £4,800, Phoebe will launch a campaign comprising of a workshop series, information books and a conference, to raise awareness of the specific challenges faced by migrant women suffering domestic abuse. 

Bright Futures

By working with young women in their communities, Bright Futures aims to build self-esteem around issues including education, sexual health, friendships and alcohol abuse. A grant of £4,800 will help to launch a ‘Future Hope’ campaign that addresses discrimination, physical and sexual abuse experienced by sex workers. 

La Dolce Vita Project

La Dolce Vita Project is a therapeutic counselling charity that supports women impacted by domestic abuse, violence and sexual violence. It will use a £4,200 grant to launch a campaign targeting policy makers in Northern Ireland to bring in a parental alienation bill, and will support and train 10-12 survivors of domestic abuse to share their stories with policy makers.

Women’s Aid South Lanarkshire and East Renfrewshire

Needs-led services including refuge accommodation, support and information are part of this group’s aim to support and empower women who are experiencing — or have experienced — domestic abuse. With £5,000 of funding, WASLER’s art group will launch a series of events to challenge harmful attitudes that devalue and endanger the lives of women and girls.

Devon Rape Crisis and Sexual Abuse Services

The belief that no-one should have to cope with rape or sexual abuse alone is at the core of Devon Rape Crisis and Sexual Abuse Services. The £3,110 will develop a project to tackle sexual harassment experienced by women in Devon, with informative and empowering workshops, a craft event and protest events. 

BAWSO (Black African Women Step Out)

Since 1995, BAWSO has provided everything from training to temporary accommodation for those affected by domestic abuse and violence including FGM, human trafficking and forced marriage. The £4,900 grant will fund a campaign to ensure women with insecure immigration status have the right to domestic abuse services.

Baobab Women’s Project C.I.C 

Baobab advises and assists women on immigration, health, financial and housing issues. Over the course of a year with its £4,920 grant, it will support a group of women to document their stories in a photo-filled book. Once published, the book will be shared with policy makers and the public to help tackle the injustices faced by undocumented women in the UK. 

Glasgow and Clyde Rape Crisis Centre

With its £4,500 grant, Glasgow and Clyde Rape Crisis Centre aims to change how the media reports gender-based violence, ultimately encouraging more survivors to report abuse. Focus groups, research surveys, campaign videos and a media checklist will culminate in a launch event to promote the campaign and its findings.

Argyl and Bute Rape Crisis Centre

Language that reinforces gender stereotypes damages women and girls, and Argyl and Bute Rape Crisis Centre’s ‘As Good As Your Word’ campaign seeks to draw attention to it. Using £5,000 of funding, the organisation will create a series of films to illustrate the negative effect of sexist language, and in turn show how positive language can foster change. 

The July Digest

Email newsletters, articles, podcasts, tweets, interviews, news bulletins: the list of ways in which we consume news could go on and on. Knowing where to source reliable news on topics like abortion law, trafficking and women in leadership – and sifting through it all when you do – is always time-consuming, often overwhelming, and occasionally mind-numbing.

With that in mind, Rosa is launching a news round-up which will condense into one digestible read the most significant UK news stories every month. We will summarise, add lashings of commentary, and include links to original articles from a range of media platforms.

Welcome to July’s edition… 

This has been the month of UK-wide, weather-related meltdown. It’s hard to fully relish record-breaking temperatures, though, when they’re inextricably linked to the continuing rise of global carbon emissions. And while it has been proven that women’s leadership at government level improves global outcomes of climate change projects, women still make up less than 20% of the clean energy workforce.

Inquiry rules MP acted lawfully in shoving Greenpeace protester

The words ‘Climate emergency’ were emblazoned onto the sashes of the Greenpeace activists who interrupted Chancellor Philip Hammond’s Mansion House speech at the end of June. The event made headlines after MP Mark Field was captured on CCTV pushing protester Janet Barker into a wall before frog-marching her out of the venue after she, well, walked past his table.

An inquiry into Field’s conduct has concluded that he acted in a ‘proportionate and lawful manner’. Ms Barker told the BBC that the purpose of the protest was to speak to “men who are in power, the bankers, the investors that are continuing to invest into fossil fuels”. A woman entering a male-dominated space, protesting peacefully, and being subject to threatening and abusive behaviour that is then deemed lawful… is it possible not to despair at the sad irony?

Countryside isolation protects rural domestic abusers

Elsewhere in the UK, a new report by the National Rural Crime Network found that rural domestic abusers are being protected by the isolation of the countryside and its upheld patriarchal values. The 18-month research project found that close-knit rural communities can facilitate abuse which can last, on average, 25% longer than in urban areas.

The report says: “Rurality and isolation are used as a weapon by abusers. Financial control, removal from friends, isolation from family are all well-understood tools of abuse.”

The Northern Irish women taking abortion pills in their bedrooms

As landmark legislation on abortion in Northern Ireland passed its final stage in UK parliament earlier this month, The Times investigates the Northern Irish women taking abortion pills in their bedrooms. One of the women interviewed for the piece is a mother who will later this year face trial ‘after she allegedly obtained abortion pills for her 15-year-old daughter, who became pregnant while in an abusive relationship’.

Housing is unaffordable for women in every English region 

There’s not a single region in the UK where a single woman on median earnings can afford to rent or buy an averagely priced house, according to a new report by the Women’s Budget Group and Women’s Housing Forum. Across England, average rent swallows up 43% of women’s median earnings and 28% of men’s, while the worst regions for affordability are, unsurprisingly, London and the South East. This article on Refinery29 delves further into housing inequalities through the lens of London renters.

New statistics prove the extent of the ethnic pay gap 

Another new report by the Office of National Statistics has revealed that workers of Pakistani or Bangladeshi heritage have the lowest median hourly pay of any ethnic group, with the latter earning 20.1% less than white British workers. London, which has the highest proportion of people classified as being in an ethnic minority group, had the largest pay gap between white and ethnic minority groups, at 21.7%.

But the ethnic pay gap doesn’t mean we should conflate or ignore the experiences of different races, writes Sana Haq in Gal-Dem.

Refuge welcomes the introduction of the Domestic Abuse Bill

Refuge welcomes today’s announcement of the Domestic Abuse Bill and seeing the Government tackle the vital topic of domestic abuse.

Reforming the criminal justice system is vitally important but so is providing emergency accommodation.

Sandra Horley CBE, chief executive of Refuge, said:

“Refuge welcomes the Domestic Abuse Bill and the important changes it will bring. Domestic abuse is the biggest issue affecting women and children in this country today.

“The Prime Minister, Theresa May, has championed the issue of domestic abuse and has brought this important piece of legislation to bear.  As the Bill stands it will bring about changes to the criminal justice system and improve the response of state agencies to women and children who experience abuse. This is much needed and Refuge supports these positive developments.

“But the criminal justice system is just one part of the puzzle when it comes to addressing domestic abuse.  It is essential that within the Bill there is a duty to provide sustainable funding for life-saving specialist domestic violence services, in particular refuges. Refuges are much more than a roof over a woman and child’s head – they provide emergency support and save lives.

“Refuge also hopes that the Bill will incorporate the suggestions made by MPs and Peers and will address the welfare system so it meets the needs of survivors, whilst giving priority access to housing and funding for women with insecure immigration status.

“Making the Bill broader in its terms of reference will ensure this once in a generation opportunity brings about much needed change to an epidemic which claims the lives of around two women every week in England and Wales alone.

“Refuge looks forward to working with the Government in the weeks to come to ensure the voices and needs of survivors are enshrined in this essential piece of legislation.”

For more information, please email press@refuge.org.uk or call 0207 395 7731. Outside of working hours, please call 07970 894240. A spokesperson is available

 

 

The post Refuge welcomes the introduction of the Domestic Abuse Bill appeared first on Refuge Charity – Domestic Violence Help.

Nominations now open for the 2019 Women in Film and Television Annual Awards Supported by Sky

We are delighted to annouce that the nominations window for the 2019 WFTV Annual Awards is now open. The annual event, now in its 29th year, celebrates the achievements of women in the industry across 14 different categories including Director, Writer, Producer, Business and Contribution to the Medium (a full list follows below).

Anyone in the industry can nominate a woman using a simple online form which can be found here.

Last year’s winners included actor and writer Phoebe Waller-Bridge, presenter and commentator Jameela Jamil, actor Nicola Walker, raising new talent Rungano Nyoni and behind the scenes talent: award winning comedy producer Gill Isles and owners of the only female run visual effects company Blue Bolt Lucy Ainsworth-Taylor and Angela Barson. Award winning and critically acclaimed actor Juliet Stevenson won the Lifetime Achievement Award.

WFTV Chair, Liz Tucker said: “This is a fantastic opportunity for everyone working in film and TV  to think about the talented women they know and nominate them for an award. We have a total of 14 categories and many of our winners have gone on to win BAFTAs. So I encourage everyone to think about the women they would like to see recognized at this year’s WFTV awards and get nominating!”

Nominate now.


Timeline

Award nominations open: 09:00 TUESDAY 16 JULY.
Award nominations close: 12:00 FRIDAY 6 SEPTEMBER.
Awards ceremony takes place: FRIDAY 6 DECEMBER (Hilton Hotel, Park Lane, London).

 

Award Categories and Definitions

The Barclays Business Award recognises outstanding business achievement by a woman in film, TV or digital media within the last three years, e.g. an executive producer, distributor, legal and business affairs executive, managing director.

The BBC News and Factual Award recognises outstanding achievement in news, factual programming, current affairs or documentary work in film, TV or digital media in the last two years. The winner should be a producer, director, researcher, journalist or special correspondent.
NB This is not an award for presenters; there is a separate award for presenters.

The ScreenSkills Writing Award recognises outstanding achievement by a woman writing for film, TV or digital media (including games) within the last two years. This is unlikely to be a first time writer, but a woman whose recent top-level authorship as a central creator adds to an impressive previous body of work.

The Deluxe Director Award recognises outstanding achievement by a woman director in film, TV or digital media across entertainment, comedy or drama within the last two years.

The ENVY Producer Award recognises outstanding achievement by a female producer in film, TV or digital media within the last two years.

The IMDb Project Management Award recognises outstanding achievement, by a female line producer, production supervisor, production manager, location manager, production accountant, or post-production supervisor in film, TV or digital media within the last three years.

The Netflix New Talent Award recognises a woman who can be seen as a significant emerging talent in film, TV or digital media, within the last two years.

The ITV Studios Achievement of the Year Award recognises a woman who has made a significant impact in any aspect of production, in front of or behind the camera in film, TV or digital media over the past year. It also recognises a woman who has contributed to raising awareness or making significant change in the area of women’s equality over the past year.

The Best Performance Award recognises outstanding acting achievement, by a female performer in TV, film or digital media within the last two years.

The EIKON Presenter Award recognises outstanding achievement by an onscreen presenter in film, TV or digital media within in the last two years.

The Craft Award recognises outstanding achievement in craft in film, TV or digital media production, especially those working in the more traditionally male-dominated sectors, within the last two years, e.g. camera, sound, lighting, grips, stunt work, set design.
NB This is not an award for post-production. There is a separate award for post.

The Technicolor Creative Technology Award recognises outstanding achievement in creativity in post production in film, TV or digital media within the last two years.

The Argonon Contribution to the Medium Award recognises a woman who has achieved excellence through her exemplary body of work over a period of at least 15 years, in film, television or digital media. This is an intermediate level of lifetime achievement, and our second most prestigious award after the Lifetime Award.

The EON Productions Lifetime Achievement Award recognises a woman whose lifetime body of work makes her an inspiration and role model. This award is in the gift of the WFTV Board of Directors.

The post Nominations now open for the 2019 Women in Film and Television Annual Awards Supported by Sky appeared first on Women in Film & TV.

EastEnders working with Refuge and Women’s Aid on Chantelle Atkin’s storyline 

 

EastEnders is working with Refuge and Women’s Aid on a domestic abuse storyline involving Chantelle and Gray Atkins.

Chantelle and Gray moved to Albert Square earlier this year with their two children Mia and Mackenzie. As they settled into Walford, they seemed to have the perfect life. Gray, a successful solicitor and Chantelle a hair stylist, they were the vision of a young professional couple, deeply in love.

However in tonight’s episode (Friday 12th July), viewers saw the devastating truth about what was happening behind closed doors. Gray attacked his wife the instant they were alone and it soon became clear this was not the first time it has happened. Despite being part of the close-knit Taylor family, Chantelle has yet to tell anyone the truth about the abuse she suffers at her husbands hands and continues to harbour the secret.

Sandra Horley, CBE, chief executive of Refuge says: “Domestic abuse is the biggest issue affecting women and children in this country today.  It is a crime which takes the lives of two women every week in England and Wales alone, with one in four women experiencing the issue in their lifetime.  Domestic abuse mostly happens behind closed doors – hidden, lurking in the shadows of our society.

The more we all understand domestic abuse, be it the physical, emotional, sexual, financial control exerted by one partner over another – and are able to spot the signs – more women, like Chantelle, will be able to seek help from specialist organisations like Refuge.   No one should live in fear of their partner. Refuge commends EastEnders for shining a light on this insidious issue.”

Teresa Parker, Head of Communications for Women’s Aid added: “It is important when portraying domestic abuse on screen to make it as realistic as possible, and EastEnders have been working with us from the early stages of the storyline, through to advising on themes to the detail of the scripts. From the initial red flags to seeing what is going on behind closed doors, this storyline has been thoroughly researched with experts in domestic abuse.

As well as using our knowledge of survivors’ stories to inform our feedback, we visited the show with Natalie, who is a survivor of domestic abuse who campaigns with us at Women’s Aid. She met with the scriptwriters and with Jessica who plays the part of Chantelle, to talk through what it is really like to experience abuse in a relationship. We look forward to supporting Jessica, Toby and the EastEnders team as they develop this new storyline, which will raise so much awareness of what is often a hidden issue.”

Kate Oates (Head of Continuing Drama Series) added: “When Chantelle and Gray arrived on the Square, they gave many of their neighbours a big dose of life-envy with their perfect relationship and no-filter-needed looks and lifestyle. But there is truth in the old adage that you don’t know what goes on behind closed doors; and the very first time we crossed the threshold of No 1, we saw the truth of their relationship, and the violence Gray subjects Chantelle to.

In this story, we seek to acknowledge the fact that any relationship, however outwardly enviable, can be affected by violence and abuse. Chantelle is strong and capable, with friends and family to support her; and yet she is still unable to voice what is happening to her, and is therefore preventing anyone from helping her because she regards her abuse as a shameful secret. We hope this story encourages women and men who experience violence to seek out the help we know they deserve.”

Taking on the storyline Jessica Plummer who plays Chantelle Atkins commented: “I feel honoured to take on the responsibility of Chantelle’s story.  This is an issue that I, and everyone at EastEnders, hope we can raise awareness of. Many women and men that are in Chantelle’s situation suffer in silence and we really hope that by showing this story we can highlight an issue and encourage those in similar situations to seek the help they need.”

Toby Alexander Smith who plays Gray Atkins added: “Chantelle and Gray’s journey is about to take a huge turn for the audience. This storyline will depict how hidden from sight domestic abuse remains even today. To the unaware eye Gray appears to be a loving husband and a committed father; but his charm is a front for the power and control he exerts over Chantelle – an experience all too common to thousands of women up and down the country today. Domestic abuse, in all its forms is against the law and is shrouded in secrecy. I hope that by tackling such a sensitive subject matter we can raise awareness of the importance of changing societal values so that both women and men’s rights to live free from abuse, invasion, disempowerment and intimidation are respected.”

 

Get help now. If your partner turns on you, turn to us. If you are in need of support please visit our support pages.

For more information, please email press@refuge.org.uk or call 0207 395 7731. Outside of working hours, please call 07970 894240.

 

The post EastEnders working with Refuge and Women’s Aid on Chantelle Atkin’s storyline  appeared first on Refuge Charity – Domestic Violence Help.