Category: news

10 days left to reach our Crowdfunder stretch target!

10 days left to reach our Crowdfunder stretch target! Help us get the full amount needed for our new home

Screen Shot 2019-03-21 at 12.54.11

Dear Feminist Library supporters,

As you are probably aware, we have been running a Crowdfunder campaign since Oct 2018. Thanks to your support we reached our initial target of £30,000. This enabled us to cover the basic costs of our move to the Sojourner Truth Centre.

Thank you so much! Once again the Feminist Library was saved by the hard work of its volunteers and the support of the community.

We decided to extend the Crowdfunder, and create a stretch target which would cover all the costs of refitting our new home. Now we have only 10 days left to reach this goal and we are asking for your support one more time.

Please do consider donating if you haven’t already: Donate now.

Achieving this goal would enable us to relax with the knowledge that the full costs are taken care of, and the Feminist Library is secure.

If you have already donated but would like to support the Library on a longer-term basis, please consider becoming a Friend.

Thank you so much for all your support so far, we’re so incredibly grateful for all the love we have received from so many people.

Love,

The Feminist Library Team xxx

Raising Films Survey Aims to Reveal True Scale of Caring Within Screen Industries

The latest piece of industry research from Raising Films – We Need To Talk About Caring – is aimed at people who are working, or who have worked, in the screen industries and who currently have caring responsibilities or have had caring responsibilities in the past.

From initial desk research Raising Films recognised a number of issues. Primarily that people are not acknowledging their caring status and within the screen industries this can stem from the ‘I need to be constantly available’ mind-set inherent with a freelance gig economy through to the lack of established structures within the industry to access support from employers. Secondly, while there is a general understanding of childcare responsibilities, the demands of providing care are less widely understood and discussed. According to Carers UK, this ‘silence’ about the level of people’s caring status within the workforce has a negative affect on their overall wellbeing.

Raising Films want to help people within the screen industries acknowledge and recognise the caring they do (or have done in the past) and want to hear how best to support these people providing care who work, have worked or want to return to work within the screen industries. They want to hear from people who are working, or who have worked, in the screen industries, across all roles and areas and who also have or have had caring responsibilities.

Complete the We Need To Talk About Caring survey as a carer HERE.
Complete the We Need To Talk About Caring survey as someone who is cared for HERE.

The survey will close on Friday 19 April and the resulting report will be launched in early June, to coincide with Carers Week 2019.

Find out more about Raising Films’ research and the We Need To Talk About Caring survey here.

The post Raising Films Survey Aims to Reveal True Scale of Caring Within Screen Industries appeared first on Women in Film & TV.

The Justice and Equality Fund announces grants to five women’s groups to end sexual harassment and abuse in the UK

The Justice and Equality Fund announces grants to five women’s groups to end sexual harassment and abuse in the UK

      • The pioneering Justice and Equality Fund managed by Rosa and supported by TIME’S UP UK, awards five new grants to women’s organisations on International Women’s Day
      • The Fund is backed by film industry professionals including Andrea Riseborough, Emma Thompson, Emma Watson and many more

Friday 8th March 2019, London UK: Today, on International Women’s Day, Rosa – the UK’s only fund for women and girls, and TIME’S UP UK announce the latest tranche of grants awarded from the Justice and Equality Fund. Five women’s groups have been awarded £463,825 to address sexual harassment and abuse in the UK.

The new grants bring the total funding distributed to women in the UK to £1.77 million, with further announcements to be made. The five women’s organisations receiving funding are:

      • Against Violence and Abuse (AVA) were awarded £99,294 and are focused on tackling sexual misconduct and harassment in
      • The Birmingham Rape and Sexual Violence Project were awarded £64,612 and are working in partnership with West Midlands Police and other community groups to prevent sexual harassment and sexual violence among the workforce to improve outcomes for all survivors of sexual violence seeking criminal justice.
      • The Good Night Out Campaign were awarded £99,944 and will support the night time economy to better understand, respond to and prevent sexual harassment in London and Birmingham’s nightlife, focussed on the LGBTQI communities and supporting through training, policy and community advocacy.
      • The Latin American Women’s Rights Service was awarded £99,995 for working in partnership with two grassroots unions representing migrant women workers in precarious employment to increase their capacity to prevent and respond to sexual harassment.
      • The Women’s Resource and Development Agency were granted £99,980 and will work in partnership with a network of women’s organisations in Northern Ireland to challenge sexism and misogyny.

 Lucila Granada, director at the Latin American Women’s Rights Service, said:

“No one should suffer sexual harassment or abuse in their workplace or community, which is why we are delighted to have been funded by the Justice and Equality Fund. We will work with IWGB and UVW, two powerful grassroots unions, to enable their members to speak up against sexual harassment at work. This grant will help us drive long term change and tackle the issues that migrant women in precarious employment have for too long faced.”

The Justice and Equality Fund was launched in February 2018 by a group of UK-based women from the entertainment industry coming together to challenge the culture of sexual harassment, assault and discrimination that persists across all industries and sections of society.

Andrea Riseborough, acclaimed British actor, producer, and initial donor to the Justice and Equality Fund said;

“For too long women and girls have faced barriers, from harassment and abuse at work to lack of representation in senior roles. The Justice and Equality Fund throws a spotlight on the issues that have previously been dismissed or ignored and challenges all workplaces and communities to ensure no woman is left behind.

“This Fund is directly supporting women to call out the challenges they face, to arm them with the tools they need to tackle sexism, harassment and abuse, and to support them to reach their full potential, so that together we can create a more balanced society.

“We have the power and responsibility as storytellers to tell more balanced stories and that is why the industry needs to be more representative. That is why today I am announcing my commitment to the #4PercentChallenge – a commitment to work with a female director in the next 18 months, as only 4% of the top studio films are currently directed by women.”

Samantha Rennie, executive director at Rosa, the UK Fund for Women and Girls, said:

“The Justice and Equality Fund was born of a desire to stamp out the culture of abuse and impunity around sexual harassment and abuse that has existed in our workplaces and communities.

The organisations we’re supporting today are preventing future harassment and abuse from taking place by raising awareness, supporting women to call out and challenge behaviour and working in partnership with allies to make work and social spaces better for all of us. It takes courage to stand up against injustice and the Justice and Equality Fund donors have done just that by showing solidarity through their generous gifts.”

ENDS

Media contacts

Rosa

Alex Delaney

alex@rosauk.org

020 3687 2745 | 07709 832453

TIME’S UP UK

Rebecca Ladbury

rebecca@ladburypr.com

07941 224 975

Notes for Editors:

About the TIME’S UP UK Justice and Equality Fund

The Justice and Equality Fund is a unique collaboration between Rosa, the UK Fund for Women and Girls, TIMES UP UK and activists fighting against gender violence in the UK to help bring an end to the culture of harassment, abuse and impunity by resourcing an expert network of advice, support and advocacy organisations and projects.

Inspired by the campaigners of #metoo, TIME’S UP, Ni Nunca Mas, the #lifeinleggings movement and others, a group of UK-based women from the entertainment industry came together to challenge the sexual harassment, assault and discrimination that persists across all industries and sections of society – from media and politics to business and transport. The actors reached out to women’s activists, who’d been working on these issues for decades, and to Rosa, the only UK-wide fund for women and girls, and together, set up and launched the Justice and Equality Fund on 16th February at the 2018 BAFTAS.

With a £1m kick-start from Emma Watson, funds poured in to the crowd-funding site. Gemma Arterton, Kiera Knightley, Tom Hiddleston, Gemma Chan, Sophie Okonedo, Emma Thompson and scores of other actors followed suit, demonstrating their solidarity with those less able to speak out against harassment, through donations to the fund. So far, over 400 donors have contributed £2.7m million towards 41 grants, with further grant announcements to be made.

The fund has reached a diverse range of communities, both rural and urban as well as a cross section of women from many backgrounds. The JEF is supporting thousands more women in the UK, but gaps remain:

      1. Women of colour are still missing out. Their organisations are small and fragile and need more support.
      2. Government cuts continue to bite, more services are closing, and access to local help is a lottery for those who need it.
      3. Most grants are for one year only. Women’s organisations need longer term funding.
      4. New data shows that girls as young as eight are being groped and harassed in public spaces (Plan International research)
      5. Anti-harassment work is losing the spotlight (Fawcett)

Show your solidarity with women facing sexual harassment here: https://uk.gofundme.com/Justice-and-Equality-Fund

About Rosa

Rosa is the first and still the only UK-wide fund for women, with a mission to leverage gender equality and social justice. We mobilise resources, make grants, champion better funding for women and convene partnerships to tackle issues facing women and girls.

Set up in 2008, we’ve distributed over £3.5m in grants to almost 350 organisations run by and for women, led the multi-million pound Tackling FGM Initiative, published evidence of inequality and reports on the case for change, as well as running the innovative Voices from the Frontline programme to support activists.

In addition to funding, Rosa also provides step up support for women’s organisations through the mentoring programme, Inspire Together, and through a series of training webinars and grantee events.

New VAWG strategy must be backed up with sustainable funding, says Refuge

In response to the Government’s new violence against women and girls (VAWG) strategy launched today (6 March, 2019), our chief executive, Sandra Horley, says: “Refuge welcomes the Government’s refreshed Violence Against Women and Girls strategy and its ongoing commitment to address violence and abuse; an issue which is experienced by one woman in four across the country and over 800,000 children every year.

“Refuge has been a lead voice in highlighting the pervasive and pernicious nature of technological abuse experienced by so many women and is heart-warmed to see the Government giving this issue more attention in today’s strategy. Given almost all of the 6,500 women and children Refuge supports every day share experiences of tech abuse, this is welcome news.

“Equally pleasing is the Government’s recognition of the need to provide more support to women who experience sexual abuse; around one third of women who accessed our services in 2018 experienced sexual violence, with disclosure of sexual abuse growing year to year.

“We look forward to working with the Government to bring this new strategy to bear but would urge the Government to share its plans on how not only new but current specialist services for women who experience violence will be funded. As we progress our work to build and shape the Domestic Abuse Bill, Refuge will be championing the need for increased funding to be injected into specialist services; funding for which has decreased year on year. Without adequate specialist support, such as services like women’s refuges, women may be forced to stay with their violent partner, unable to escape abuse and fear. “

Find out more about the Government’s VAWG strategy.

For more information, please email press@refuge.org.uk or call 0207 395 7731. Outside of working hours, please call 07970 894240.

The post New VAWG strategy must be backed up with sustainable funding, says Refuge appeared first on Refuge Charity – Domestic Violence Help.

Interviews with Laura Coryton and Laura Steven

For our Friends Scheme March Prize Draw we are really excited to have two new books to give away, kindly donated by Egmont PublishingWe will be holding the prize draw on Thursday 14th March, at our AGM,  and two lucky winners will receive copies of both books! To be entered into the draw sign up to become a Friend of the Library:https://feministlibrary.charitycheckout.co.uk/friend#!/

We caught up with the authors Laura Coryton and Laura Steven to find out more about them and the books.


speak upSpeak Up! 
by Laura Coryton


Written by Laura Coryton, who led the international campaign against tampon tax, Speak Up! is a vital and timely book exploring what it means to stand up for what you believe in on both a public and personal level.

What inspired you to write the book? 

I visit lots of schools as part of the Tampon Tax campaign to support girls hoping to make changes. The schoolgirls I talk to are always so enthusiastic and determined to solve the problems they face. They are my inspiration for this book! I hope that ‘Speak Up!’ can support a new wave of rebel girls committed to changing the world.

What made you a feminist? 

I think I was born a feminist… When I was growing up, I was perpetually rolling my eyes. I was forever frustrated by what I thought was just ‘being a girl’. I hated the way men would stare at my friends and I as we walked in our uniforms to school in the morning. I was confused as to why everyone would watch the boys play basketball while nobody seemed to know our girl’s team even existed. I was angry at the presumption that I would study food tech and not maths because that’s what “girls do” (quote courtesy of my school’s careers advisor – no, seriously). But actually, I was never frustrated with being female. What I was, and still very much am, actually angry at, are the symptoms of sexism that so many of us face. I was a feminist. Always!

What sparked your period tax campaign? And what have you learned from it that you would like to share with our readers?  

My friends and I are always sharing feminist articles with each other. One day, my lovely friend Verity sent me an article that explained we pay tax on period products. I was confused. I presumed this tax must make some sense if the government was to back it (I was clearly young and naive) but when I started to research our tax system, I got angry. I discovered that while we don’t pay tax on maintaining our private helicopters, because apparently, that’s too essential to tax, we do pay tax for the luxury of buying period products each and every month. Seriously! Nobody was talking about the issue because there is a taboo surrounding women’s bodies and more specifically, around periods. I hope the campaign has helped to tackle that taboo, too!

From my campaign I have learned that anything is possible. If I got David Cameron to utter the word ‘tampon’ in parliament when he was Prime Minister, then you can do anything! I’ve learned that girls have such a passion for making changes and I’m really excited for what future changes their campaigns will bring. Essentially, my piece of advice to any reader would be to be ambitious, never give up and speak up!

Is there anything else you’d like to share with young girls and women just getting into feminism that could help them along their journey?

I think something that’s not spoken about enough is failing. It’s okay to fail. Everybody fails from time to time, but a singular failure doesn’t mean that you’re destined to fail. Lots of us fail and go on to ultimately succeed. You can do the same!

a girl called shamelessA Girl Called Shameless by Laura Steven

It’s been two months since a leaked explicit photo got Izzy involved in a political sex scandal – and the aftershock is far from over. The Bitches Bite Back movement is gathering momentum as a forum for teenage feminists, and when a girl at another school has a sex tape shared online, once again Izzy leads the charge against the slut-shamers

What inspired you to write the book? 

A Girl Called Shameless is about an aspiring comedian whose world implodes when dirty pictures involving her, a politician’s son and a garden bench emerge online. I really wanted to take down slut-shaming and revenge porn, but I also wanted to weave in some seemingly innocuous themes – like the concept of the ‘Friend Zone’, and the problem with men who consider themselves ‘Nice Guys’ – and unpack why they can be just as damaging as the more overt symptoms of sexism. Plus I really wanted to tell a lot of rude jokes. I love rude jokes. (Which is why I will probably never win the Booker.

What made you a feminist? 

While I’ve always believed in gender equality, and always wanted the same opportunities that were available to my brother, I don’t think there was ever one single moment that made me a feminist. It’s been a journey, more than anything, and a journey I’m very much still on. There are areas I need to do better in, and I’ll never stop trying to educate myself into becoming the best feminist I can be. We’re all always learning, and always growing, and I think it’s important to give each other space to do that – while also holding each other accountable when we mess up. I really love how actress and activist Jameela Jamil refers to herself: a feminist-in-progress.

What has inspired you to join Mslexia? And what have you learned from it that you would like to share with our readers?

I actually left Mslexia after three and a half years back in October, and I miss it every day. It was a wonderful environment in which to grow as both a writer and a feminist, and I got to work with some truly talented people. The main thing I learned was the importance of carving out spaces for marginalised voices, and the value of lifting up other women. It was often frustrating, because we received so many accusations of being sexist, but we fundamentally believed in supporting women writers in a notoriously male-dominated industry. This may seem a little trite, but when it comes to Mslexia, I always think of this Theodore Roosevelt quote (via Leslie Knope): ‘Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.’ I also learned that if you fire Lionel Shriver from a judging panel for being racist, you will be told to kill yourself by alt-right trolls.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with young girls and women just getting into feminism that could help them along their journey?

Do you believe men and women should be treated equally? Great, you’re already a feminist! Of course, it’s often more nuanced than that, and there are countless different debates that fall under the feminism bracket. It may seem like the world expects you to be perfect from the outset, and to know every single thing about every single one of these debates, but that’s impossible. The best thing you can do is listen to those who are more knowledgeable than yourself. Seek out a broad intersection of women from all walks of life, listen to their views, and never shout over them. Unless they voted for Donald Trump. Then some shouting is allowed.

Friends Scheme March 2019 Prize Draw

Friends Scheme March 2019 Prize Draw 

This month we are really excited to have two new books to give away, kindly donated by Egmont Publishing.

a girl called shameless speak up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Girl Called Shameless by Laura Steven
It’s been two months since a leaked explicit photo got Izzy involved in a political sex scandal – and the aftershock is far from over. The Bitches Bite Back movement is gathering momentum as a forum for teenage feminists, and when a girl at another school has a sex tape shared online, once again Izzy leads the charge against the slut-shamers.

Speak Up! by Laura Coryton
Written by Laura Coryton, who led the international campaign against tampon tax, Speak Up! is a vital and timely book exploring what it means to stand up for what you believe in on both a public and personal level.

We will be holding the prize draw on Thursday 14th March, at our AGM,  and two lucky winners will receive copies of both books!

To be entered into the draw sign up to become a Friend of the Library:https://feministlibrary.charitycheckout.co.uk/friend#!/

Find out more about the books and read our interviews with the authors here: http://feministlibrary.co.uk/interviews-with-laura-coryton-and-laura-steven/

Free Photocopier for good home!

Free Photocopier for good home!
Due to our move, we have an old photocopier to give away. The printer brand is SHARP and make is MX-5000N
The machine is in good condition, but it might need a service. We can supply the name of a reliable maintenance person.
You would have to pay to remove it to its nowlocation.
It would not be available until just before we move later this spring, date TBC.
If interested please email admin@feministlibrary.co.uk

New Home Crowdfunder – Stretch Target

New Home Crowdfunder  

Help us reach our stretch target by 31st March! Anchor

Thanks to you we smashed our initial £30,000 Crowdfunder target! This will enable us to move the Library and cover the basic refit of the new building. We have also received close to £20,000 in off-line donations, from generous Trade Union branches, feminist organisations and individual donors. We are immensely grateful to each and every supporter.

We now have a stretch target with the aim of raising £65,000 to cover the whole cost of the refit! Although we have raised enough to ensure our collection is safe, we really need this final amount to make a proper home for the Library. Due to offline donations, we only need to reach  £48,000 online to reach this goal. Please do donate, we are very nearly there!

We have until 31st March to reach our final target – you can help us by spreading the word of our Crowdfunder campaign to your friends and relatives: https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/help-the-feminist-library-build-its-new-home/

In the past week or two, we also had new media coverage – you can read up on our conversation with White Fox Publishing here – and we have been invited to speak about the Library and its campaign at this fabulous Show & Tell event intended to inspire young people not to give up their dreams of working in arts & culture. And last but not least, the brilliant new addition to our feminist design team, Anna Lincoln, was interviewed for the Narrative Environments blog about her work, including her latest – Feminist Library new home project!

Mobile Feminist Library Van – Interview with Kristin Luke

van2IMG_20190209_153031The Feminist Library has recently collaborated with artist Kristin Luke to create the Mobile Feminist Library! Kristin converted the van by hand to create a mobile community library, and worked with Feminist Library volunteers, particularly our Artist in Residence Minna Haukka, to fill it with a selection of books, zines and periodicals.

The van will be popping up as part of the exhibition Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Act 2 at the De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea on 2 March, 3 April, 18 & 25 – 27 May, with more dates and locations to be announced.

One of our Trustees, Anna Pigott interviewed Kristin about the project:

How did you come up with the idea of a mobile Feminist Library?

For a long time I have been interested in how networks, long-term collaborations, radical pedagogy, archives, and their intersection with feminist politics, could better inform my own work. I gave a lot of thought to how I could make my practice, which spans sculpture, architecture, and film, more useful to these causes. I also looked back at the history of mobile education, from the Women’s Packhorse Library Network of the Appalachians to Jo Spence’s mobile photography darkroom. I decided that I wanted to created a mobile platform, or environment, which could transport and keep alive precarious bodies of knowledge, whether they are printed, performed, filmed, etc, and take them to locations potentially quite unlikely and remote. I wanted to do this as a distinctly counter-patriarchal approach to the preservation and dissemination of knowledge. I approached the Feminist Library because I instantly felt this could be a very exciting combination, especially after meeting Minna Haukka (the FL’s artist in residence), and seeing how she was really bringing the collection to life.

Is it similar to work you have made before?

I have definitely made a lot of physical work that combines architecture and multi-functional furniture. I have designed and built entire furnished living spaces for previous art projects, so the idea of making a self-contained environment was fairly familiar to me. But I’ve never worked on a project over such an extended period of time, or that could potentially involve quite so many different collaborators, which is very exciting. And I’ve never worked on a project involving a vehicle before.

Where are you planning to take it?

Our first stop was the De La Warr Pavilion, for the opening of the exhibition Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Act 2. We will return to this location several more times. Minna Haukka and I are in the process of setting out the schedule for the mobile library as we speak – this will include art and educational institutions, schools, literary festivals, and even some quite remote, wild locations. I am interested in the healthy complexities that might arise from sharing these texts in places that might not be as familiar with them.

How will you be recording its progress?

The full route for the van will be documented and announced on this interactive map, so keep an eye out for upcoming stops.

What have people’s reactions been so far?

People’s reactions have been a really interesting combination of pangs of nostalgia, curiosity, a genuine enjoyment of the sensory experience of being inside the van, and the excitement of being able to pick up these books and journals which might otherwise be under glass or not allowed to be removed from a library. I think people have had this feeling, especially at the De La Warr Pavilion, that the van is this kind of secret environment where something unusual is happening, which is operating on its own terms, which is a fundamentally different way to encounter knowledge than in a school, university, gallery, etc. Many people have also felt that the mobile FL collection would really activate and complement the events and exhibitions that they are running too – it’s great that they want to further engage with it in a meaningful way, and keep this momentum going by sharing it with others.

What’s your favourite feature of the van?

That it has a piece of Snowdonia slate as a cover for the cooker. And the 5-way expanding sofa.

Kristin Luke (b.1984, Los Angeles, lives in Snowdonia) is an artist whose sculptural, written, and filmic work spans the themes of radical pedagogy, utopianism, forms of feminist resistance, and magical thinking in late capitalism. Her work and collaborative projects have been included in programmes at the De La Warr Pavilion, Somerset House, ANDOR, Bas Fisher Invitational (Miami), and New Shelter Plan (Copenhagen). She helped revive the journal Schooling & Culture in collaboration with May Day Rooms and The Showroom, and was an Open School East associate.

IMG_20190209_153042 IMG_20190209_153035
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New Acquisitions List – March 2019

Periodicals

Lesbian Connection, Vol 41, Iss 2, Sept/Oct 2018, Lesbian Connection.

Older Feminist Network Newsletter, No 232, October/November 2018.

Lesbian Connection, Vol 41, Iss 3, Nov/Dec 2018, Lesbian Connection.

Rain and Thunder: A Radical Feminist Journal of Discussion and Activism, Issue #70, Summer 2018.

Feminism & Psychology, Vol. 28, No. 3, August 2018, Sage.

Women of China, April-September 2018.

Lesbians are Dying Out: A Comic about Transphobia, 2018, self published.

“it’s just everywhere” A study on sexism in Schools – and how we tackle it, 2018, UK Feminista.

Exploring the Economic Impact of Brexit on Women, March 2018, Women’s Budget Group.

The Female Face of Poverty, July 2018, Women’s Budget Group.

The Female Face of Poverty, July 2018, Women’s Budget Group.

Women Count, May 2018, Women’s Budget Group.

Feminism & Psychology, Vol 28, No 4, November 2018, Sage.

Gilt, self-published.

Cuntry Living, Autumn 2018, Autumn 2018, self-published.

Cultural & Social History, Volume 14, Issue 15 , December 2017, Routledge.

Freedom Socialist, Volume 39, No. 3, June-July 2018.

Fortune, October 1, 2017.

Rain and Thunder: A Radical Feminist Journal of Discussion and Activism, Issue #71, Winter 2018.

Awesome Monster, -, -, -.

New Books: 

Angela Carter, The Magic Toyshop: Introduced by Carmen Callil, Virago, 1967; 2018.

Rosamund Lehmann, The Weather In The Streets: Introduced by Elizabeth Day, Virago, 1936; 2018.

Janet Frame, Faces In The Water: Introduced by Hilary Mantell, Virago, 1961; 2018.

Rebecca West, The Return of the Soldier: Introduced by Victoria Glendinning, Virago, 1918; 2018.

Muriel Spark, Memento Mori: Introduced by A. L. Kennedy, Virago, 1959; 2018.

Patricia Highsmith, Deep Water: Introduced by Gillian Flynn, Virago, 1957; 2018.

Elizabeth Taylor, A View Of The Harbour: Introduced by Sarah Waters, Virago, 1947; 2018.

Mary Renault, Fire From Heaven: Introduced by Tom Holland,Virago, 1970; 2018.

Karin Klenke, Women In Leadership: Contextual Dynamics and Boundaries, Emerald Publishing, 2011; 2018.

Ruth Pearson; Sundari Anitha, Striking Women: Struggles and Strategies of South Asian Women Workers from Grunwick to Gate Gourmet, Lawrence and Wishart, 2018.

Peter Purton, Champions of Equality: Trade Unions and LGBT Rights in Britain, Lawrence and Wishart, 2017.

Sarah Boston, Women Workers and The Trade Unions, Lawrence and Wishart, 2015.

Chris Linder, Sexual Violence On Campus: Power Conscious Approaches to Awareness, Prevention and Response, Emerald Publishing, 2018.

Eva Tutchell and John Edmonds, The Stalled Revolution: Is Equality For Women An Impossible Dream?, Emerald Publishing, 2018.

Alison Temperley, Inside Knowledge: How Women Can Thrive in Professional Service Firms, Emerald Publishing, 2017.

Zing Tsjeng, Forgotten Women The Writers, Hachette, 2018.

The Socialist Party of Great Britain, Silvia Pankhurst on Socialism, The Socialist Party of Great Britain.

Alyson Hallett and Rachel Bentham (editor), Project Boast, Triarchy Press, 2018.

Jack Dromey & Graham Taylor, Grunwick: The Workers’ Story, Lawrence and Wishart, 2015.

Joanna Williams, Women Vs Feminism: Why we all need liberating from the gender Wars, emerald Publishing, 2017.

Liv Stromquist, Fruits of Knowledge: The Vulva Vs The Patriarchy, Virago, 2018.

Katherine Connelly, Silvia Pankhurst: Suffragette, Socialist and Scourge of Empire, Pluto, 2013.

Grace Kitto, Saving Grace, September Publishing, 2018.

Sharon Blackie, If Women Rose Rooted, September Publishing, 2018.

Sharon Blackie, The Enchanted Life, September Publishing, 2018.

Nyna Giles, The Bridesmaid’s Daughter, September Publishing, 2018.

Corinne Sweet, Money on’t Table, September Publishing, 2018.

Linda Wilkinson, Columbia Road, Of Blood and Belonging, 2018.

Berwick Street Film Collective, Nightcleaners ’36 to ’77, Koenig Books, 1975/2018.