Author: emmathatcher

Crowdfunder Update – Week 5

We’ve had a fabulous few weeks on Crowdfunder, thanks to you!  We are now just 20% away from our target and well on track to reaching it!

If we can give the campaign a good push in the remaining weeks, we may be able to reach our stretch funding target of £65,000! – meaning we would be able to build exhibition space in our new home, buy new boxes for our periodicals, and more! Please help us by donating now, and sharing the campaign.

Recent coverage includes our interview for Dissident Island Radio, an article published in the Londonist , our story of struggle and survival on History Dayblog, and a lovely blog post from FLA Network

To add to the excitement, we have been meeting our soon-to-be neighbours in Peckham, including a new girls football group, Girls United FC, an inspiring sewing project for empowering women, Make it Studio, Hub & Culture. We can’t wait to meet even more of you amazing people on our next trip!

We have also received the first amazing draft drawings for our special edition prints (coming soon!) from Lucie Russell ofDrawing People Together.

Last, but by no means least, our marvellous matron, Ali Smith, has donated a set of her books – and donated the name of a character in her next book(!) to add to our crowdfunder rewards!

We are extremely grateful to all the amazing writers, creative organisations and individuals who have supported us by donating their time and work to help make our crowdfunding efforts a success.

The Feminist Library Winter Fayre 2018 – Saturday 8th December

The Feminist Library Winter Fayre 2018
Saturday 8th December
13:00-17:00
Entry: Book here or donation on the door (link for tickets)

Come and join us for a glass of something mulled and a rifle through our new and used books and zines where you can pick up some treasures to gift or keep to yourself!  We will also have our Feminist Library tote bags and T shirts, and some of our friends selling their fantastic feminist crafts as well as festive drinks and edibles, zine making, a Make + Change badge workshop, a feminist gingerbread workshop and a raffle (woohoo!). If you’re very lucky we might even crack out the karaoke. If you have any books you would like to donate for our sale please let us know.

Have Your Say About Our New Space – 29th Nov

Have Your Say About Our New Space
29th November, 7pm to 9pm 

Our New Space: Sojourner Truth Community Centre 161 Summer Road, London SE15 6JL
Please join us for a sneak peak of our new home in Peckham and a planning meeting to discuss what the library should offer and share your ideas about the speakers and events we can organise for the year ahead.

Please RSVP to volunteer@feministlibrary.co.uk

Museums Showoff – 20th November

Museums Showoff
Tuesday 20 November, 
downstairs at The Phoenix, 37 Cavendish Square, Marylebone, London W1G 0PP
Doors open 6.45pm, show starts 7.30pm. Tickets are £7 (+ 70p booking fee).
An open mic night featuring curators, conservators, librarians, collectors, trustees, security people, retail folk, educators, funders, explainers, visitors, academics, archivists and everyone else associated with museums, libraries, archives and collections. Brilliant performers will reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects.
Magda Oldziejewska our Fundraising Coordinator will be talking about the Feminist Library’s long, and eventually triumphant, struggle for survival, and its campaign for the move to its new home. Together with a collective rendition of the Feminist Library survival song, this should be an inspiration to other organisations struggling against austerity and other anti-community forces.

History Day – 27th November, Senate House

History Day
27th November 2018
Senate House, London, Wc1E 7HU
History Day is a one-day event bringing researchers together with information professionals from libraries, archives and research organisations. The event includes a history fair and a series of drop-in talks. The Feminist Library will be participating in the 1.15-2.15 talk.

1.15–2.15 Researching people across collections

  • Paul V. Dudman (University of East London), The Past in the Present: Orienting Research, Scholarship and Practice in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies around Archives and History
  • Howard Falksohn (Wiener Library), Kathrin Pieren (Jewish Museum London), Daniel Albon (London Metropolitan Archives), Clare George (Institute of Modern Languages Research / Senate House Library), Jewish history, the Holocaust and refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe
  • Magda Oldziejewska and Gail Chester (Feminist Library) and Susan Croft (Writer, Curator, Director of Unfinished Histories), Feminist libraries and archives: working at the intersection of archiving, art and activism

https://historycollections.blogs.sas.ac.uk/history-day-2018/

New Acquisitions List – November 2018

  • Ed. Reina Gossett, Trap Door, MIT Press, 2017
  • Patu / Ante Schaupp, A Brief History of Feminism, MIT Press, 2017
  • Ed. Merve Emre et al., Once and Future Feminist, MIT Press, 2018
  • Ria Brodell, Butch Heroes, MIT Press, 2018
  • Marie Hicks, Programmed Inequality, MIT Press, 2018
  • Joni Seager, The Women’s Atlas, Myriad, 2018
  • Carol A. Stabile, The Broadcast 41, Goldsmiths Press, 2018
  • Ben Barres, The Autobiography of a Transgender Scientist, MIT Press, 2018
  • Sergio Gonzales Rodriguez,  The Femicide Machine,  Semiotext(e), 2012
  • Daniella Valz, GenSubversive Economies, PSS, 2018
  • Victoria Sin, A View from Elsewhere, PSS, 2018
  • Somalia Abdulali, What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape, Myriad, 2018
  • Kate Zambrano, Heroines, Semiotext(e), 2012
  • Chris Kraus, Social Practices, Semiotext(e), 2018
  • Cynthia Ewloe, The Big Push, Myriad, 2017
  • Ana, Becoming Unbecoming, Myriad, 2015
  • Nicola Streeten & Cath Tate, The Inking Woman, Myriad, 2018
  • Wendy Jones, The Sex Lives of English Women, Serpent’s Tail, 2016
  • Angela Steidele, Gentleman Jack, Serpent’s Tail, 2018
  • Elena Poniatowska, Leonora, Serpent’s Tail, 2011
  • Pauline Black, Black by Design, Serpent’s Tail, 2012
  • Geraldine Joan Beare & Cynthia L. White, Moira House: Portrait of a Progressive School, Moire House, 2000
  • Elfriede Jelinek, The Piano Teacher, Serpent’s Tail, 2016
  • Albertini Sarrazin, Astragal, Serpent’s Tail, 2014
  • Chris Kraus, Aliens & Anorexia, Serpent’s Tail, 2016
  • Deborah Cameron, Feminism, Profile, 2018
  • Saengeeta Bandyopadhyay, Panty, Tilted Axis, 2016
  • Saengeeta Bandyopadhyay, Abandon, Tilted Axis, 2017
  • Hwang Jungian, One Hundred Shadows, Tilted Axis, 2016
  • Kairani Barokka, Indigenous Species, Tilted Axis, 2016
  • Han Yujoo, The Impossible Fairytale, Tilted Axis, 2016

Lunch Time Chats with our Neighbours – Thursday 25th October

Screen Shot 2018-10-22 at 15.27.20Lunch Time Chats with our Neighbours
Thursday 25th October 2018, 12:30-13:30pm
Tate Exchange, Level 5, Blavatnik Building, Tate Modern, Bankside
London, SE1 9TG

The Tate Neighbours have invited a variety of speakers to lead informal discussions based on short texts that have inspired them to engage with the lives of their neighbours and to commit to neighbourly action.

The Feminist Library will be doing a reading of the West-East Bag Consciousness Raising Rules (1972). Visitors can take part in a mini taster Consciousness Raising session and think about acts of ‘everyday resistance’ and what the phrase ‘the personal is political’ means to us.
Bring your lunch, drop in, and join in these informal conversations.

Interview with Jenni Murray

a history of the world in 21 womenFeminist Library’s Magda Oldziejewska recently interviewed Woman’s Hour’s Jenni Murray, who has just published a new book on women’s history, A History of the World in 21 Women. A signed copy of the book recently landed at the Feminist Library, courtesy of the Publisher, Oneworld Publications, and will be given away in our winter Friends Scheme draw, to one lucky Friend. To find out more about being a Friend or to sign up, go to: www.feministlibrary.co.uk/support/friends-scheme/

Magda: Your book is really lovely, I loved it, because I’m so passionate about women’s history. And so I wanted to first ask you about what motivated you to write the book.

Jenni:I was talking to my editor and I said: “Look, there are so many women all across the world, some of whom I’ve actually met, who really deserve a similar sort of treatment.” Because what I wanted to do with these women’s history books was to take women I admired, had learned about, really, often quite late in life as a result of working on Woman’s Hour, either because we’d discussed the ones who were long dead, or I had actually interviewed the ones who were [still around], and they deserved a similar sort of treatment to the ones I’d done for Britain. So that young people, who are really not taught much women’s history, if any women’s history, in school, will get the opportunity to find out about them. And then of course I discovered that a lot of older women were very interested in this as well. So it had a really wide appeal to women and girls of all ages, that they wanted to find out about these women.

I came into this, some of it, quite early, like Queen Elizabeth I and Queen of Scots, and Boadicea… but a lot of them I’d come across really rather late as a result of working on Woman’s Hour, where there was a group of young female academics, like professor Janet Todd, who were turning around and saying: “Look, nobody’s really studied women”. I mean, talk about, for example, Jane Austen – there were no real detailed books about Jane Austen until after she was died.

Janet Todd writes beautifully. But not a lot of academics write in an accessible way, and I thought that what I would like to do is to take a number of women in one book, do an entire background to their lives, in as much detail as I can, and in a relatively short and accessible way. And then I thought, we should do this the world over!

And, I think, particularly this year, with it being the 100th anniversary of some women in this country winning the vote, people are becoming aware of what women have done and how little they’d known about it. I was there when the Fawcett statue was unveiled in Parliament Square, and I’d known about Fawcett for a long time, I’m president of the Fawcett society, but people had never heard of her! People didn’t know the difference between a suffragette and a suffragist! And I thought, they need to know these things, it’s really important. It’s what influenced all our lives in the 20thand 21stcentury.

And I think that there’s a greater hunger for knowledge about it as a result of what happened this year where so many people have been talking about the suffragettes and suffragists. A statue of a suffragette will be unveiled in Manchester when they finally get her up. There was a huge debate about whether Emmeline Pankhurst was to stay near the House of Commons or whether she was to be moved. The fight has been won, she’s going to stay. There is a real hunger for knowledge about it, I think.

M: What you also mention in the introduction to your book that you have actually met some of the women that you write about, so I was wondering if you had any stories that have really stuck in your mind that you might like to share?

J: Anna Politkovskaya was one of the women I interviewed who I most admired. You know, a journalist – I’m a journalist too – and when we spoke to each other we both wore our glasses at the end of our nose, which we laughed about. And then we talked about my kind of journalism – which, you know, when you’re a journalist in this country, your reputation might rubbished, you might be criticised, but you don’t fear for your life. But the kind of journalism that she did, she certainly did fear for her life, and yet she carried on. You know, covering the Chechyen war, being very critical of Putin, trying to help… And then, of course, the big thing that she tried to do was help the children who were kept as hostages in Beslan. And she had hoped that she would be able to get in touch with the Chechyens who were there and try to persuade them to leave the children and make them safe. And then she told me very clearly what had happened: she had gone to the airport to get on a plane to go to Beslan, she had to use her mobile phone which she said you’d never do in Russia because you knew that someone would be listening, but she absolutely had to do to contact somebody who was there to say that she was coming. She was heard, she got on the plane, she was given a cup of tea, which she drunk, and the next thing she recalled was waking up in a hospital because obviously she had been drugged to prevent her from going. And then of course Putin sent in the heavies and then a lot of people died as a result.

And then she’d written a book about Putin in which she was so critical of him. And we ended the conversation saying we hoped we’d meet again because we were clearly very much of a like mind, and I would have liked to go on speaking to her… And then 2 years later she was assassinated. She was shot.

Wangari Maathai is another woman who really impressed me. A young Kenyan girl who grew up in the countryside. As she got older, she was very lucky, her parents had allowed her to go to school, which is unusual. She was very bright, did very well at school. Managed to be selected for a scheme where she would go to America to get her higher education there. Came back to Kenya and begun to be aware that the Kenya that she came back to was not the Kenya that she had left. Obviously politically it had changed, but also environmentally it had changed. When she came back, it was not the fertile land that she had left. It was muddy, it was dirty. And trees had been planted for profit, so they were not indigenous trees. She was appalled at the state of the country.

She married a man who was very critical of her outspokenness. The country’s president, when she tried going into politics, said the same thing, that she should be a ‘proper’ African woman, and shut up. She suffered terribly for her activism.

But then she thought, what we have to do is start planting trees that belong here, indigenous trees. And the way she did that was to gather groups of women who were prepared to plant trees. And eventually some charity money came in. And, very amusingly, she said, when they started getting the charity money coming in, they managed to get some tools, and, she said, funny enough, the men started coming in! So she said, if you want a man to do a job, you need tools!

But, you know, they planted, over her lifetime, something like 50 million trees. A lot! She had tremendous impact on ecology. Not only in Kenya, her impact spread far and wide. She won the Nobel prize, which is amazing.

What most impresses me about so many of these women is how they’ve stuck their heads above the parapet, because they’re determined they’re going to do something really effective. And quite often they get their heads chopped off…

M: It’s incredibly inspiring. I wanted to also ask you about your early days at Woman’s Hour – how that came about and whether, at the time, you were also involved in the women’s movement, or if not, how that came about?

J: I wouldn’t say that I was ‘involved’ in the women’s movement, just living it, I think.

I joined the BBC in local radio in 1973, in Bristol, having been rejected by the BBC when I applied for a job in London as a studio manager. But I did manage to get into Bristol and then went down to Southampton and worked in television, in the regional programme. And then was asked to go and work on Newsnight. So news and current affairs has been my background, but always interested in women’s issues. Worked on the Today programme.

I have to say, my time on Newsnight was not the best time of my life. There were a lot of male presenters and two women, and we were known as ‘Newsnight wives’!

So I went to Today and had a terrific time on Today. I had, by then, my two sons. In fact, I was pregnant with my second son when I started on Today, so he accompanied me in those very early mornings.

And then, eventually, I got a call from Woman’s Hour and they said: “Would I like to come and be on Woman’s Hour?”, and I went so fast you couldn’t see me for dust! You know, I loved working in news and current affairs, but what was terrific about Woman’s Hour was, not only did it have the women focus, but we would do politics, current affairs, books, art, theatre, music, films… the range was just extraordinary and different from anywhere, because it was a magazine programme that covered absolutely everything. As long as we could convince ourselves that we were promoting women speakers and the subjects we were discussing were of interest to women, we could do anything we liked, really. Women are interested in everything!

So that’s how it started. And that was 1987. So I have been there 31 years now!

M: Thank you!

J: Thank you!

Press release: London’s Feminist Library needs to raise £30,000 for a new home

Press Release: For Release Immediate Release, 16th October 2018

London’s Feminist Library needs to raise £30,000 for a new home 

They are asking for the public’s support in a Crowdfunder 

new dragon logo_move

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The much loved, volunteer-run library needs to leave its current premises in Westminster Bridge Road in Spring 2019, as the building is due for redevelopment.

Southwark Council have offered the collective a new building to rent, the Sojourner Truth Community Centre at 161 Summer Road in Peckham.

The building has great potential and they would really like to make this a reality. However it is very expensive to move a library, and to completely refit an old building!

They now need to fundraise urgently and are asking for the public’s support to help raise the £30,000 needed. Without this money the Library may have no option but to close, after 43 years of operation.

They have launched a Crowdfunder campaign, running from 16th October until 9th December 2018. All money raised will go towards fitting out the new space, moving the thousands of books that the Library holds, and the legal costs that come with the massive logistical project that is moving a library. 

Please help the Feminist Library to continue and get the home it rightly deserves. Donate now:  https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/help-the-feminist-library-build-its-new-home  

Madga Oldziejewska, a member of the Feminist Library collective said: The Feminist Library has survived for over 4 decades by the goodwill and passion of our dedicated volunteers and supporters, and with next to no governmental or external funding. We are now counting on the community’s support to make this move happen. Please donate to help us protect this vital community resource.”

Campaign video link: https://vimeo.com/294665284

Hashtag: #feministlibrarynewhome

theory and fiction rooms_2016

Exciting Rewards

Donors to the campaign will receive various rewards, including:

£25 – Special edition ‘move’ tote bags

£40 – Feminist Library tote bag and zine bundle

£50 – VIP Tickets to the Grand Opening Party

£60 – Special edition artwork donated by Lucie Russell

£80 – Champagne and Cake Tea at the Library  

£120 – Framed limited edition print donated by artist Lucie Russell

£150 – Framed limited edition photographic print by the iconic feminist activist poet and artist Astra Blaug, donated by her son Adam Blaug

£200 – Set of artist’s photographic prints donated by artist Megan Jordan

£300 – Set of 2 paintings on canvass donated by artist Daiane Medeiros

£400 – Set of 3 framed paintings donated by artist Syeda Alishba Amin-ud-Din

£500 – Yourname engraved on your own shelf in our new fabulous space! (choose your section!)

The Urgent Need to Move

The Library has had various homes over the years, but has never had both a stable and adequate space for its valuable collection.

In 2016 it weathered the most recent crisis, when threatened with eviction after a rent rise. Thanks to massive public support, both nationally and internationally, it gained a reprieve. (Read more about the struggle to save the Library here.) 

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Now however, as the building is due for redevelopment, it has no choice but to move. The management collective need to fundraise urgently for this new home, to be able to keep the Library running. They wish to ask the public to support the Library one more time to make this happen.

Vision for the New Building

This move is opening up a new chapter in the Feminist Library’s ‘herstory’. The management collective’s aim is to give the Library the secure home for the future that it rightly deserves!

The proposed new space is part of the Sojourner Truth Community Centre – named after the famous African-American activist and abolitionist. It is at the heart of the local community – located on Sumner Road in Peckham and is completely wheelchair accessible.

It is 1,500sq ft, which is 50% bigger then their current cramped premises. It will give substantially increased shelving space, as well as office space, and a kitchen to provide food at community events. This will enable them to build on the priceless collection and expand their vibrant community programme, as well as to have new exhibition space to showcase feminist art and archive materials.

The Sojourner Truth Community is also a listed building, which will mean security for years to come, which is much needed for the Library to thrive. They will be sharing the building with a number of other community organisations, including a couple of women’s groups.

New home design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Pigott, a Feminist Library volunteer said: “We hope to take this opportunity to make the Library an even more accessible and inclusive feminist space than it has been so far, by welcoming the local community and meeting our new neighbours” 

Feminist Design Collective

The Feminist Library is lucky to have an amazing team of feminist architects, designers and makers lined up to work on the project, who are giving their time for free to make the new space possible. The space will be designed by HI-VIS and Lucy Sanderson, and the fittings built by Power Project– collectives of feminist architects, designers and makers, who will also be teaching young women and non-binary people wood and metal work skills while making the Library’s new furniture!

About The Feminist Library

fllogonewThe Feminist Library is much more than just a library! It was founded in 1975 by a small group of passionate volunteers, at the height of the Women’s Liberation Movement, to collect and preserve what has become one of the most important collections of feminist material in the UK.

It has an incomparable collection of over 7,000 books, 1500 periodical titles from around the world, archives of feminist individuals and organisations, pamphlets, papers, posters, and ephemera.

It is a registered charity, mainly volunteer run and completely self-funding. It opens five days a week and welcomes visitors of any gender. It is committed to a community policy that is intersectional, non-sectarian and trans inclusive.

It also provides a space in London for feminists and community groups to have meetings, readings, exhibitions and events, and enables research and activism.It supports not just archiving work, but also publishes its own zines and supports independent producers and artists. It is a vitally important community space.

Notes for Editors:

For more information please contact: 

Email: emma@feministlibrary.co.uk with any enquiries.

Tel: 0207 261 0879

Web: www.feministlibrary.co.uk

Feminist Library, 5a Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW

Registered Charity No. 1174735

Twitter: @feministlibrary

Facebook: FeministLibrary

Instagram: thefeministlibrary

Help the Feminist Library Build its New Home – Crowdfunding Campaign

Help the Feminist Library Build its New Home

Crowdfunding Campaign Launches Today!

Help us Raise £30,000

1538749958_new dragon logo_move

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please help the Feminist Library to continue and get the home it rightly deserves. Donate now: https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/help-the-feminist-library-build-its-new-home

Dear all, we are very excited to announce that we have found a new home!

Southwark Council have offered us a new building to rent, the Sojourner Truth Community Centre at 161 Summer Road in Peckham. The building has great potential, but it is very expensive to move a library, and to completely refit an old building!

We are today launching a Crowdfunder campaign, running from 16th October until 9th December 2018. We need to fundraise urgently and are asking for your support to help raise the £30,000 needed.

All money raised will go towards fitting out the new space, moving the thousands of books, and the legal costs of moving a library. Without this money the Library may have no option but to close, after 43 years of operation.

The Feminist Library has survived for over 4 decades by the goodwill and passion of our dedicated volunteers and supporters, and with next to no external funding. We are now counting on the community’s support to make this move happen. Please give what you can, help protect this much loved community resource and preserve Feminist Herstory.

The Urgent Need to Move
We need to leave our current premises in Westminster Bridge Road in Spring 2019, as the building is due for redevelopment. We have no choice but to move and so urgently need to make the new building fit for purpose.

Exciting Rewards
Donors to the Crowdfunder campaignwill receive various rewards, including:

£25 – Special edition ‘move’ tote bags
£40 – Feminist Library tote bag and zine bundle
£50 – VIP Tickets to the Grand Opening Party
£60 – Special edition artwork donated by Lucie Russell
£80– Champagne and Cake Tea at the Library
£120– Framed limited edition print donated by artist Lucie Russell.
£150 – Framed limited edition photographic print by the iconic feminist activist poet and artist Astra Blaug, donated by her son Adam Blaug
£200 – Set of artist’s photographic prints donated by artist Megan Jordan
£300 – Set of 2 paintings on canvass donated by artist Daiane Medeiros
£400 – Set of 3 framed paintings donated by artist Syeda Alishba Amin-ud-Din
£500 – Your name engraved on your own shelf in our new fabulous space! (choose your section!)

Vision for the New Building
New home design
The proposed new space is part of the Sojourner Truth Community Centre – named after the famous African-American activist and abolitionist. It is at the heart of the local community and is completely wheelchair accessible.

It is 1,500sq ft, which is 50% bigger then our current cramped premises. It will give substantially increased shelving space, office space, and a kitchen to provide food at community events. This will enable us to build on our priceless collection and expand our vibrant community programme, as well as new exhibition space to showcase feminist art and archive materials.

The Sojourner Truth Community is a listed building, which will mean security for the Library for years to come. We will be sharing the building with a number of other community organisations, including a couple of women’s groups.

Feminist Design Collective
The Feminist Library is lucky to have an amazing team of feminist architects, designers and makers lined up to work on the project, who are giving their time for free to make the new space possible. The space will be designed by HI-VIS and Lucy Sanderson, and the fittings built by Power Project– collectives of feminist architects, designers and makers, who will also be teaching young women and non-binary people wood and metal work skills while making the Library’s new furniture!

Please donate, ask your friends and family to donate, share the Crowdfunder page and help us to give the Library the secure home for the future that it rightly deserves! 

 #feministlibrarynewhome

1539020580_theory and fiction rooms_2016